All posts by USA Diving

Dorman and Ipsen place seventh in synchronized 3-meter at World Championships

KAZAN, Russia – Kristian Ipsen (Clayton, Calif./Stanford, Calif.) and Sam Dorman (Tempe, Ariz./Coral Gables, Fla.) finished seventh in the men’s synchronized 3-meter final Tuesday at the FINA World Championships.

The American pair scored 405.99 points, while China’s Cao Yuan and Qin Kai took the gold after finishing with 471.45 points. The Russian duo of Ilia Zakharov and Evgenii Kuznetsov were second with 459.18 points, while Great Britain’s Jack Laugher and Chris Mears came away with bronze at 445.20.

Ipsen and Dorman were in sixth place through four rounds, but a miss for just 67.20 points on their reverse 3 ½ tuck in round five dropped them to ninth.

“You miss one dive and you’re out, but we had fun. I went over on my gainer. It happens, but you’ve got to move onto the next dive,” Dorman said.

After the miss, the pair came back with 82.95 points on their final dive, a reverse 1 ½ with 3 ½ twists, to move them back up to seventh. They were 2.67 points behind the fifth-place team from Canada.

“(The finals) went pretty well. Our timing feels really good. We just missed one dive, and in a contest like this, that’ll take you out of it,” said Ipsen, a 2012 Olympic bronze medalist in synchronized 3-meter. “I feel like we have a lot more in store for us in the future.”

Ipsen and Dorman also were seventh in the morning preliminaries with 404.13 points.

The three medalists earned their countries a spot in the 2016 Olympic Games. Four additional spots will be determined at the 2016 FINA Diving World Cup.

The diving events at the World Championships continue through August 2. Wednesday’s competition features preliminaries and semifinals in women’s 10-meter, with Amy Cozad (Indianapolis, Ind./Bloomington, Ind.) and Jessica Parratto (Dover, N.H./Bloomington, Ind.) competing for Team USA. Parratto will also compete with David Boudia (Noblesville, Ind./West Lafayette, Ind.) in Wednesday’s team competition.

Michael Hixon wins bronze on 1-meter at FINA World Championships

KAZAN, Russia – Michael Hixon (Amherst, Mass./Bloomington, Ind.) came from behind to win bronze in the men’s 1-meter competition Monday for Team USA’s first diving medal at the 2015 FINA World Championships. Kristian Ipsen (Clayton, Calif./Stanford, Calif.) finished sixth in that same event, while Amy Cozad (Indianapolis, Ind./Bloomington, Ind.) and Jessica Parratto (Dover, N.H./Bloomington, Ind.) were ninth in women’s synchronized 10-meter.

Hixon scored 428.30 points to edge Mexico’s Jahir Ocampo by 0.95 points for the 1-meter bronze, while China’s Xie Siyi finished with 485.50 points for the gold. Illya Kvasha of Ukraine took the silver with 449.05 points.

Hixon was ninth after four of six rounds but moved into the medal hunt after 70.50 points on a reverse 2 ½ tuck that put him in fifth heading into the last round. He was 13.5 points out of the bronze medal spot with one round to go and his most difficult dive still remaining.

“I just tried to go one dive at a time, especially in those last two rounds when I was about 20 points out. I kept fighting. I just wanted to do six dives the best I could. Other things are out of my hand as far as how other divers do or how the judges score,” said Hixon, who became the first U.S. man to medal on 1-meter at a World Championships since four-time Olympian Troy Dumais won silver on the event in 1998.

Hixon, who used an inward 2 ½ tuck as his last dive in Friday’s preliminaries, upgraded to an inward 2 ½ pike for the finals. The tuck carries a degree of difficulty of 3.1, while the pike has a DD of 3.4.

“There’s more risk, but more reward,” said Hixon, who finished ninth in the preliminaries to qualify for the finals.

The decision paid off, as Hixon earned mostly 8s and 8.5s for 83.30 points on the inward 2 ½ pike. It was enough to surpass Ocampo and Ukraine’s Oleg Kolodiy, who also received 8s and 8.5s on their final dives but had a lower degree of difficulty to allow Hixon to overtake them.

“I’m a scoreboard watcher for sure. I knew Oleg Kolodiy from Ukraine was in third, but he was doing a reverse 1 ½ 1 ½, which is 2.6 (DD). After he goes 65 points on it, I knew I was still in the game. When I hit my dive and I saw the scores, I was pretty happy. I walked over to (coach Drew Johansen) and said, ‘Are you thinking fourth?’ He said, ‘Let’s wait on Mexico.’”

It was worth the wait. Ocampo was the final diver of the contest, and he finished with 70.50 points on a front 3 ½ tuck, putting him fourth behind Hixon. Kolodiy finished fifth.

USA’s Ipsen was sixth with 420.65 points. He was in 10th place with one round to go before finishing out with 86.40 points on a reverse 1 ½ with 3 ½ twists to move up to sixth in the final standings.

“I’m pretty satisfied, but I did leave a little bit on the table with my fifth dive. I can do that dive (reverse 2 ½ pike) better, and I thought I was going to hit it. I was moving really fast, but I got little too excited,” Ipsen said. “Overall, I’m really happy with both the prelims and finals on 1-meter, but I could have done a little better today.”

Cozad and Parratto scored 295.86 for ninth in the women’s synchronized 10-meter final. They were in 12th place after missing their third-round front 3 ½ pike for just 54.90 points but rallied back with 71.04 and 73.92 points on their last two dives – an inward 3 ½ tuck and a back 2 ½ with 1 ½ twists – to move up to ninth.

“There were some misses here and there on a few dives. There are definitely some things we could clean up, but this was our first big meet together. We’ll learn from it,” Parratto said.

China’s Chen Ruolin and Liu Huixia were first with 359.52 points, and Canadians Roseline Filion and Meaghan Benfeito finished second with 339.99 points. Kim Un Hyang and Song Nam Hyang of North Korea were third at 325.26. The three medalists qualified their countries a spot in the 2016 Olympic Games.

Diving events at the FINA World Championships continue through August 2. Ipsen and Sam Dorman (Tempe, Ariz./Coral Gables, Fla.) will compete men’s synchronized 3-meter on Tuesday. Hixon next dives in the individual men’s 3-meter event on Thursday, while Parratto and Cozad are set to dive in Wednesday’s individual women’s 10-meter event.

Boudia and Johnson finish fifth in 10-meter synchro at World Championships

KAZAN, Russia – David Boudia (Noblesville, Ind./West Lafayette, Ind.) and Steele Johnson (Carmel, Ind./West Lafayette, Ind.) finished fifth in the men’s synchronized 10-meter final and Samantha Pickens (Murrysville, Pa./Tucson, Ariz.) tied for 16th in the women’s 1-meter preliminaries Sunday at the FINA World Championships.

Boudia and Johnson scored 436.35 points, 4.98 points out of the bronze medal. China’s Chen Aisen and Lin Yue topped the field with 495.72 points, with Mexico’s German Sanchez and Ivan Garcia scoring 448.89 for silver. The Russian duo of Victor Minibaev and Roman Izmailov won the bronze with 441.33 points.

The Americans were in a three-way tie for second through two rounds but dropped to sixth after scoring 73.92 points on an inward 3 ½ tuck in round three. They fell another spot to seventh with 78.54 points on a reverse 3 ½ tuck in round four before closing out the night with 83.25 points on a front 4 ½ tuck and 95.04 points on a back 2 ½ with 2 ½ twists to finish in fifth place.

“Fifth is not ideal. That’s not where we want to be. We were a little below average in rounds three and four, and we were just shy of second and third place. Obviously it’s not fun to be in this position, but ultimately we know what we’re capable of. There are a lot of pros to walk away with going into February and the World Cup,” Boudia said.

The three medalists qualified their countries a spot into the 2016 Olympic Games, with four remaining spots to be determined at the 2016 World Cup. The U.S. pair was third at the 2014 World Cup in Shanghai.

Boudia and Johnson scored 451.02 points to finish second behind China in the morning preliminaries, when they scored 99.90 points on their front 4 ½ tuck and 90.72 points on their back twister.

“We’ve been training really hard and working on all our dives. I’ve been having a lot of trouble with my 4 1/2, especially after Mexico (at a World Series meet in late May). My main thing the past month or so has just been trying to get that dive back. It happened to be my best dive in both lists, so that was really cool to see,” Johnson said.

With 237.70 points in the 1-meter preliminaries, Pickens won’t advance, but she did complete a strong comeback that nearly earned her a spot in Tuesday’s final. After scoring just 27.30 points on her second round front 2 ½ pike, Pickens found herself in 32nd place. She came back with more than 50 points on each of her next three dives, climbing to 26th after three rounds and 20th after four round before ultimately finishing tied for 16th after five dives. She was just 4.85 points out of making the final.

“I could have done my second dive a lot better. I didn’t do it the way I’d been practicing so it was kind of a bummer, but everything else was solid. I’m going to take a lot away from this experience,” Pickens said.

Diving events at the FINA World Championships continue through August 2. Monday’s competition features Amy Cozad (Indianapolis, Ind./Bloomington, Ind.) and Jessica Parratto (Dover, N.H./Bloomington, Ind.) in women’s synchronized 10-meter and Michael Hixon (Amherst, Mass./Bloomington, Ind.) and Kristian Ipsen (Clayton, Calif./Stanford, Calif.) in the men’s 1-meter final.

Johnston/Ryan ninth, Anderson/Bromberg 13th on day two of World Championships

KAZAN, Russia – Abby Johnston (Upper Arlington, Ohio/Durham, N.C.) and Laura Ryan (Elk River, Minn./Athens, Ga.) finished ninth in women’s synchronized 3-meter Saturday at the FINA World Championships, while Samantha “Murphy” Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) and Mark Anderson (Lake Forest, Calif./Austin, Texas) were 13th in the debut of mixed gender synchronized 10-meter at the World Championships.

Johnston and Ryan scored 292.50 points in the women’s 3-meter synchro final, which was won by China’s Wu Minxia and Shi Tingmao with 351.30 points. Canada’s Jennifer Abel and Pamela Ware took the silver with 319.47 points, and Australia’s Esther Qin and Samantha Mills were third at 304.20.

The Americans were consistent in the final, scoring 66.6, 64.80 and 67.50 points on their three optional dives. The first two rounds of dives set the tone for the final standings as Johnston and Ryan scored just 93.60 points on their first two dives, putting them in ninth place before the start of the three rounds of optionals. All three medalists had more than 100 points after two rounds.

“Overall it was a pretty solid list for us. There are definitely some things we could sharpen up, but we did the best we could today. We’re looking to next year to improve before the World Cup,” said Ryan, who will compete in the individual 3-meter event on Friday. “(Today) I had all the tops I wanted, so moving forward, I think I’m going to be spot on for individual. I’m excited to have another opportunity to get back out there.”

The three medalists qualified their countries a spot in the 2016 Olympic Games. In all, eight countries – including host Brazil – will compete in each of the Olympic synchronized diving events in Rio de Janeiro next year. The remaining four spots will be determined at the 2016 FINA Diving World Cup.

“I think we dove pretty strong, but I’m disappointed in the outcome. I’ll put that one aside and get ready for individual on Friday,” Johnston said.

Johnston and Ryan advanced to the final after placing eighth with 275.40 points in the morning preliminaries.

In the debut of mixed gender synchro at the World Championships, Anderson and Bromberg scored 274.14 points for 13th place in their first international competition together as a mixed 10-meter synchro team. They earned the berth on the world team after winning the national title in mixed 10-meter synchro back in April.

“I’m excited to be here. We could have dove better, but it was the first world final that I’ve been in, so I was happy about that. It wasn’t our best day, but I’m still happy with how we did,” Anderson said.

The Americans’ best dive came in round three, when they scored 65.70 points on a front 3 ½ pike to stand in 10th place with two rounds to go. They dropped to 13th after round four as their back 2 ½ with 1 ½ twists earned just 57.60 points, and then they finished out their list with 61.40 points on an inward 3 ½ tuck.

“It was fun. Overall, I would say it was a positive experience. Obviously it didn’t go as well as we wanted, but sometimes that happens and it’s important to learn from it,” Bromberg said.

China’s Si Yajie and Tai Xiaohu won gold with 350.88 points, while Canada’s Meaghan Benfeito and Vincent Riendeau came out ahead in a close contest for silver. The Canadians scored 309.66 to edge Australians Melissa Wu and Domonic Bedggood, who were third with 308.22 points.

Diving events at the FINA World Championships run through August 2. Sunday’s events feature David Boudia (Noblesville, Ind./West Lafayette, Ind.) and Steele Johnson (Carmel, Ind./West Lafayette, Ind.) in the men’s synchronized 10-meter event and Samantha Pickens (Murrysville, Pa./Tucson, Ariz.) on women’s 1-meter.

 

Ipsen, Hixon advance to 1-meter finals at FINA World Championships

KAZAN, Russia – Both U.S. divers competing on the opening day of the FINA World Championships advanced to the finals, as Kristian Ipsen (Clayton, Calif./Stanford, Calif.) finished fourth and Michael Hixon (Amherst, Mass./Bloomington, Ind.) was ninth in Friday’s men’s 1-meter preliminary competition. Their 1-meter final is set for Monday.

Ipsen finished with 400.70 points for fourth place in the preliminaries, with Mexico’s Jahir Ocampo scoring 412.70 points to earn the top qualifying spot into the finals.

“I’m happy I stayed consistent. The scoring was really difficult and I knew that going in because I’ve been in one of these contests before. On 1-meter, I knew not go crazy and just try to stay consistent and land on my head straight up and down. If I could do that, I thought I’d be able to make the final. I’m really excited,” said Ipsen, who missed the 1-meter final at the 2013 World Championships after placing 17th in the preliminaries two years ago.

Ipsen was in third, fourth or fifth place in the standings after each of the six rounds in Friday’s preliminaries. He scored more than 63.55 points on five of his six dives, including a reverse 1 ½ with 3 ½ twists that earned 81 points in the last round for the highest score by any diver in the preliminaries.

“I’m really happy with how it went. I did the best list of dives that I’ve done in a long time. I put all the dives together that I’ve been doing in practice. I think in the finals I can clean up some of my entries a little bit more,” said Ipsen, who is competing in his fourth World Championships.

Hixon scored 373.85 points for ninth place and a spot in the finals. While Ipsen hovered in the top five for the entire contest, Hixon had to fight his way into the top 12. In 13th place after two rounds, Hixon dropped to 16th after scoring 51 points on his front 3 ½ tuck in round three. He remained in 16th place after the fourth round but jumped to 12th after round five, when he scored 64.50 points on his reverse 2 ½ tuck. He then closed out his list with 75.95 points on an inward 2 ½ tuck to move him to ninth place.

“That’s the way these prelims go. It’ll be the same on 3-meter. It’s just a grind. It’s not really about the hits as much as it is about avoiding the big misses. I had a pretty decent miss in the third round and I came back pretty well, especially in the last two rounds. I hit a gainer and then did an inward as well as I can do it, and it got me into the final,” said Hixon, who is competing in his second World Championships.

Diving events at the World Championships continue through August 2. Saturday’s competition features Abby Johnston (Upper Arlington, Ohio/Durham, N.C.) and Laura Ryan (Elk River, Minn./Athens, Ga.) in women’s synchronized 3-meter and Samantha “Murphy” Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) and Mark Anderson (Lake Forest, Calif./Austin, Texas) in mixed gender synchronized 10-meter.

 

Universal Sports Network to provide coverage of FINA World Championships

LOS ANGELES (July 20, 2015) – Universal Sports Network and NBC will air more than 48 hours of premier pool action from the 2015 FINA World Aquatic Championships in Kazan, Russia, from Saturday, July 25, through Sunday, August 9. More than 2,400 athletes representing 190 countries will compete in a record 75 medal events in the world championships for diving, swimming, synchronized swimming and water polo.

Universal Sports kicks off coverage on Saturday, July 25, at 6 p.m. ET with the mixed synchronized 10M platform diving finals, followed by the synchronized swimming solo technical competition at 10 p.m. ET. The first day of water polo group play takes place on Sunday, July 26, at 6 p.m. ET, when the USA women, fresh off of their gold medal win at the Pan Am Games, take on Brazil.

NBC begins swimming on Sunday, August 2 at 1:30 p.m. ET, followed by daily live coverage from Monday, August 3, through Friday, August 7 at 10:30 a.m. ET on Universal Sports. NBC’s coverage continues on Saturday, August 8 at 3 p.m. ET, and on Sunday, August 9 at 2:30 p.m. ET, concluding the world championships. Veteran swimming play-by-play commentator Dan Hicks, U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame member and three-time Olympic gold medalist Rowdy Gaines, and Emmy Award-winning reporter Michele Tafoya will call all swimming coverage on NBC and Universal Sports Network.

In addition, UniversalSports.com will live stream all events that air on Universal Sports Network (Online streaming schedule). NBC Sports Live Extra – NBC Sports Group’s live streaming product for desktops, mobile devices and tablets – will stream all programming that airs on NBC.

This year’s World Aquatics Championships will feature world-class competition including:

Diving: London Olympic medalists David Boudia, Abby Johnston and Kristian Ipsen will lead Team USA in traditional platform and springboard diving events. Boudia will partner with 19-year-old Steele Johnson, who will make his senior world championships debut, in synchronized events after the duo medaled at last summer’s FINA Diving World Cup.

Swimming: Leading the 54-member Team USA are veterans including 2012 Olympic gold medalist and four-time World Championships gold medalist Katie Ledecky, 2012 Olympic gold medalist and nine-time World Championships gold medalist Missy Franklin, four-time Olympic medalist and six-time World Championships medalist Nathan Adrian, and 11-time Olympic medalist and 23-time World Championships medalist Ryan Lochte.

Synchronized Swimming: For the first time in the history of the FINA World Championships, males and females will compete together in synchronized swimming. In the inaugural mixed duet competition, USA Synchro will be represented by Hall of Famer Bill May, who was previously barred from competing at international events because of his gender, and Olympians Christina Jones and Kristina Lum Underwood. May and Jones will compete in the technical routine while Underwood will compete with May in the free routine.

Water Polo (Women): On the heels of their fourth straight gold medal win at the 2015 Pan Am Games, the U.S. women’s water polo team is looking for an unprecedented fourth FINA World Championship. The No. 1 world-ranked team and reigning Olympic champions are led by veterans Maggie Steffens, Courtney Mathewson and Ashleigh Johnson.

Water Polo (Men): Following their gold medal win at this year’s Pan Am Games, the U.S. men’s water polo team will face stiff competition at FINA Worlds from Greece, Italy and host country Russia in pool play. With their win over Canada in the Pan Am semi-finals, the Team USA clinched a spot at the Rio Olympic Games behind the play of rising stars such as Luca Cupido and veterans Tony Azevedo and Merrill Moses.

Universal Sports Network and NBC Broadcast Schedule: 2015 FINA World Aquatics Championships

All times ET – Schedule subject to change – All coverage is Same Day Delay except where noted.

Date Time (ET) Coverage Network
Sat., July 25 6 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
10 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
Sun., July 26 6 p.m. Water Polo (Women): USA vs. Brazil Universal Sports
7 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
10:30 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Mon., July 27 6 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
7 p.m. Water Polo (Men): USA vs. Russia Universal Sports
8 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Tues., July 28 6 p.m. Water Polo (Women): USA vs. Italy Universal Sports
7 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
8 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Wed., July 29 6 p.m. Water Polo (Men): USA vs. Greece Universal Sports
7 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
8 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Thurs., July 30 6 p.m. Water Polo (Women): USA vs. Japan Universal Sports
8 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
9 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
10 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Fri., July 31 6 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
7 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
8 p.m. Water Polo (Men): USA vs. Italy Universal Sports
Sat., Aug 1 7 p.m. Synchronized Swimming Finals Universal Sports
8 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Sun., Aug. 2 1:30 p.m. Swimming NBC
6 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
7 p.m. Diving Finals Universal Sports
Mon., Aug. 3 10:30 a.m.* Swimming Finals Universal Sports
6 p.m. Water Polo (Women): Quarterfinals Universal Sports
Tues., Aug. 4 10:30 a.m.* Swimming Finals Universal Sports
6 p.m. Water Polo (Men): Quarterfinals Universal Sports
Wed., Aug. 5 10:30 a.m.* Swimming Finals Universal Sports
7 p.m. Water Polo (Women): Semi-Finals Universal Sports
Thurs., Aug. 6 10:30 a.m.* Swimming Finals Universal Sports
6 p.m. Water Polo (Men): Semi-Finals Universal Sports
Fri., Aug. 7 10:30 a.m.* Swimming Finals Universal Sports
7 p.m. Water Polo (Women): Bronze Match Universal Sports
8 p.m. Water Polo (Women): Gold Match Universal Sports
Sat., Aug. 8 3 p.m. Swimming NBC
6 p.m. Water Polo (Men): Bronze Match Universal Sports
7 p.m. Water Polo (Men): Gold Match Universal Sports
Sun., Aug. 9 2:30 p.m. Swimming NBC

* LIVE Coverage

ABOUT UNIVERSAL SPORTS NETWORK

Universal Sports Network, a partnership between NBC Sports and InterMedia Partners, LP, is the premier multi-platform media destination for Olympic-related sports programming in the United States.  Offering more than 1,200 hours of original programming each year, Universal Sports has exclusive rights to world and national championship events in a wide array of sports, including swimming, track and field, gymnastics, cycling, skiing, figure skating and rugby. Whether on television, online, or on the go with mobile and tablet applications, Universal Sports offers a four-screen experience to fans of global sports every day of the year. For more information, please visit UniversalSports.com.

ABOUT NBC SPORTS GROUP

When the Comcast-NBCUniversal transaction was completed in January 2011, the sports assets of the two companies combined to form NBC Sports Group, which serves sports fans 24/7 with premier live events, insightful studio shows, and compelling original programming. The sports media company consists of a unique array of sports assets, including NBC Sports, NBC Olympics, NBCSN (NBC Sports Network), Golf Channel, 10 NBC Sports Regional Networks, NBC Sports Radio and NBC Sports Digital. NBC Sports Group possesses an unparalleled collection of television rights agreements, partnering with some of the most prestigious sports properties in the world: the International Olympic Committee and United States Olympic Committee, the NFL, NHL, NASCAR, PGA TOUR, PGA of America, Churchill Downs, Premier League, Tour de France, French Open, Formula One, IndyCar and many more.

(This information is courtesy of a press release from Universal Sports.)

U.S. wins two bronze medals in synchronized diving events at Pan Am Games

TORONTO – U.S divers won a pair of bronze medals in synchronized diving events at the Pan American Games on Monday, the final day of diving competition at the games.

Deidre Freeman (Grinnell, Iowa/Iowa City, Iowa) and Maren Taylor (Arlington, Va./Austin, Texas) won bronze in women’s synchronized 3-meter, while Cory Bowersox (Burke, Va./Austin, Texas) and Zac Nees (Hatfield, Pa./State College, Pa.) were third in men’s synchronized 3-meter.

Freeman and Taylor finished with 293.10 points, third behind Mexico’s Paola Espinosa and Dolores Hernandez (301.20) and Canada’s Jennifer Abel and Pamela Ware (298.23). Freeman and Taylor’s score was their career best in an international competition, topping their previous best of 286.80 from the 2014 FINA Canada Cup. The Pan Am bronze was their third international bronze medal together, having also won bronze at the 2014 Canada Cup and 2014 Malaysia Grand Prix.

The Americans were in second place after round three, when they scored 69.30 points on their back 2 ½ pike. The Canadians overtook them in the fourth round when they scored 73.47 points on a front 3 ½ pike, while Freeman and Taylor received 62.10 points on a reverse 2 ½ pike to move to third. They held onto the bronze medal spot with 65.70 points on their final dive, a front 2 ½ with one twist.

“We were consistent, and that’s what we strive for. These are some really good teams, and we’re really proud we stayed close to them in the scores. Deidre and I don’t live in the same place, so we don’t get to practice together as often as some other teams do, but we have similar styles so that helps a lot,” said Taylor, who took fifth in Sunday’s individual 3-meter event.

The men’s 3-meter synchro bronze was the first international medal for Bowersox and Nees, who have won two national championships together. They scored 385.38 points for third behind Mexico’s Rommel Pacheco and Jahir Ocampo (438.27) and Canada’s Philippe Gagne and Francois Imbeau-Dulac (413.37).

The Americans prevailed in a close contest with Colombia’s Sebastian Morales and Sebastian Villa and Brazil’s Cesar Castro and Ian Matos for the bronze medal. With two rounds to go, less than half a point separated the three teams, with Colombia in third and USA in fifth. Bowersox and Nees scored 76.38 points on their front 4 ½ tuck in round five, moving them into third place with one dive to go. They finished out their list with an inward 3 ½ tuck that earned 75.48 points to keep them in the third spot. Brazil finished fourth with 374.61, while Colombia took fifth at 371.64.

“I’ve been to three international competitions previously for synchro and got fourth place twice and fifth once, so I’m happy to finally get on the podium. We knew how close it was. At the end of every round, we looked. We’re both pretty mathematically oriented, so it’s good for us to know the numbers to help us focus on what’s coming next and where we stand,” said Nees, who earned a degree in computer science from Miami in 2014. Bowersox is an engineering major at Texas.

Also on Monday, Samantha “Murphy” Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) and Delaney Schnell (Tucson, Ariz.) took fourth in women’s synchronized 10-meter, while Zach Cooper (Greenwood, Ind.) and Ryan Hawkins (Charlotte, N.C./Blacksburg, Va.) were fifth in men’s synchronized 10-meter.

Bromberg and Schnell scored 287.82 points, just .09 points out of the women’s 10-meter synchro bronze medal in their first meet together as a synchro team.

“It was really close and that was tough, but it’s just going to make us work that much harder as we focus on the big picture,” Schnell said.

Canada’s Roseline Filion and Meaghan Benfeito, the 2012 Olympic bronze medalists, won gold with 316.89 points. Brazil’s Ingrid De Oliveira and Giovanna Pedroso were second at 291.36, while 2012 Olympic silver medalists Paola Espinosa and Alejandra Orozco of Mexico scored 287.91 to edge the U.S. team for the final spot on the podium.

Cooper and Hawkins, competing together internationally for the first time, scored 348.39 points for fifth in the men’s 10-meter synchro final.

“I thought we had a great performance overall. We both had some really good dives except for our reverse, which we both missed. This was such a talented field. We were competing against a bunch of Olympians, and we had a lot a fun,” Hawkins said.

Cuba’s Jose Guerra and Jeinkler Aguirre won the gold with 439.14 points, while Canada’s Philippe Gagne and Vincent Riendeau scored 404.34 points for the silver. Colombia’s Victor Ortega and Juan Rios rounded out the podium with 403.23 points for bronze.

With the conclusion of the Pan American Games, many of the team members will next be in action at the AT&T USA Diving National Diving Championships in Orlando, Fla., from August 11-13. Bromberg will also compete at the FINA World Championships in Kazan, Russia, later this month.

All four U.S. divers advance to finals on day three of Pan Am Games

TORONTO – All four U.S. divers competing Sunday at the Pan American Games advanced to the finals in their respective events. Maren Taylor (Arlington, Va./Austin, Texas) led the way with a fifth-place finish on 297.60 points in the women’s 3-meter final, while Deidre Freeman (Grinnell, Iowa/Iowa City, Iowa) took ninth with 259.35 points in that same event. Zach Cooper (Greenwood, Ind.) scored 355.35 points for ninth in men’s 10-meter, with Ryan Hawkins (Charlotte, N.C./Blacksburg, Va.) finishing 10th with 351.15 points. It was the first Pan American Games for all four.

Canada’s Jennifer Abel won the women’s 3-meter event and Mexico’s Ivan Garcia took the men’s 10-meter gold to earn their countries a quota spot for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Taylor rallied with a strong finish to earn a top-five showing. In eighth place with one round to go, Taylor saved her best dive for last. She scored 67.50 points on her inward 2 ½ pike, enough to jump to fifth place in the final standings. She was second in the morning preliminaries, scoring 316.40 points to finish only behind Abel.

“These are some of the best divers in the world. To be up there with them is a confidence booster and a good building block for me. This experience has been amazing. I’ve never competed in front of so many people. It was exciting, but definitely a little nerve-wracking,” Taylor said.

Abel dominated the finals with 384.70 points for gold, highlighted by a front 2 ½ with two twists that earned 85 points. Canada’s Pamela Ware scored 326.00 points for silver, while Mexico’s Delores Hernandez finished third at 323.10.

After placing sixth in prelim, Freeman started strong in the finals and was third after two rounds, much in part to a reverse 2 ½ pike that earned 69 points. She dropped to ninth in round four after scoring just 41.85 points on her front 3 ½ pike, a relatively new dive for her.

“There’s room for improvement. It’s a work in progress and I’m getting better, but it’s still not there yet. My (front 3 ½ pike) is a newer dive for me. It’s only the second time I’ve competed it internationally. Every time I compete, I learn something new,” Freeman said.

Cooper, at age 17, was the youngest diver in the men’s 10-meter final. His highest scoring dive in the finals was his back 3 ½ tuck, which earned 67.65 points. He was eighth in the prelims, including an 82.60-point inward 3 ½ tuck.

“I was pretty nervous, but I had a lot of fun. It was great being up there with the big guys,” Cooper said.

Hawkins started strong and was in second place after two rounds in the finals, earning 70.50 points on his opening front 3 ½ pike and 72 points on his second-round inward 3 ½ tuck. He faltered on his next three dives, including a balk on his fifth-round armstand double back somersault with 1 ½ twists that earned just 30.40 points, to drop to 12th place heading into the last round. He came back with his best score of the night, finishing with 82.80 points on his back 2 ½ with 2 ½ twists to jump up to the 10th.

“It was nerve-wracking. I think I had more nerves in the morning, but I was still nervous in the finals. It was such a cool experience just being up there and doing my dives,” said Hawkins, who was ninth in the prelims.

Garcia scored 521.70 points to win gold and earn Mexico a quota spot for Rio 2016. Colombia’s Victor Ortega scored 455.15 points for the silver, and Mexico’s Jonathan Ruvalcaba was third with 437.35 points.

Diving competition at the Pan American Games concludes Monday with finals in all four synchronized diving events. Taylor and Freeman will competed synchronized 3-meter, while Cooper and Hawkins will pair up in synchronized 10-meter. Delaney Schnell (Tucson, Ariz.) and Murphy Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) will compete women’s synchronized 10-meter, and Zac Nees (Hatfield, Pa./State College, Pa.) and Cory Bowersox (Burke, Va./Austin, Texas) will dive men’s synchronized 3-meter.

Bromberg leads U.S. with fifth place on day two of Pan Am Games

TORONTO – Samantha “Murphy” Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) led the U.S. with a fifth-place finish in Saturday’s women’s 10-meter final at the Pan American Games, while Delaney Schnell (Tucson, Ariz.) was eighth in that same event. Zac Nees (Hatfield, Pa./State College, Pa.) finished 11th in the men’s 3-meter final.

Divers from Mexico won both events to secure quota spots for their country for next year’s Olympic Games. Paola Espinosa won the women’s 10-meter gold, with Rommel Pacheco taking gold on men’s 3-meter.

Bromberg, who was third in Friday’s preliminaries, scored 337.95 points to finish fifth in her first Pan Am Games. She had a consistent performance in the finals, earning 60 or more points on all five dives. She scored 79.20 points on her armstand triple back somersault in round three and closed out her list with 68.80 points on her final dive, an inward 3 ½ tuck.

“I learned a lot from this experience. It was great diving in front of such a big crowd, and I was fairly consistent in the finals. I had some good tops. I just had to calm down my nerves early on,” Bromberg said.

Schnell finished with 263.40 points for eighth place. She started slowly with a miss for just 36 points on her opening-round front 3 ½ pike. She came back with 52.80 points or more on each of her remaining four dives, with her best score coming in round four when she earned 60.80 points on her back 2 ½ with 1 ½ twists. A two-time Junior Pan Am silver medalist on platform, Schnell was the youngest competitor in the field at age 16.

“It wasn’t my best, but I’m going to take the positives and use this to help make me better so it doesn’t happen again. I had a lot of fun, and I am so much younger than a lot of the other competitors. I really enjoyed competing against the older girls,” Schnell said.

Espinosa scored 383.20 points for the 10-meter gold, with Canadians Roseline Filion and Meaghan Benfeito taking silver and bronze with 377.60 and 357.45 points.

Nees finished with 367.70 points in the finals, improving his preliminary score by 40.05 points and moving up one spot in the standings after placing 12th in prelims. Nees opened the finals with 72.85 points on his front 3 ½ pike and scored more than 60 points on three other dives – including 64.75 on his reverse 3 ½ tuck that caused him problems in the prelims.

“It’s been a great experience. I wasn’t happy with how I finished, but I was happy with my mechanics (in the finals). I had some good starts, but I missed some bottoms,” Nees said. “This was probably one of the most fun competitions I’ve been in. The crowd, the facility, everything has been amazing.”

Pacheco scored 483.35 points for the gold while his teammate Jahir Ocampo finished second with 442.15 points. Canada’s Philippe Gagne scored 421.20 points for the bronze.

Diving events at the Pan American Games continue through Monday, July 13. Sunday’s competition features preliminaries and finals in men’s 10-meter and women’s 3-meter. Zach Cooper (Greenwood, Ind.) and Ryan Hawkins (Charlotte, N.C./Blacksburg, Va.) will represent the U.S. in the men’s events, while Deidre Freeman (Grinnell, Iowa/Iowa City, Iowa) and Maren Taylor (Arlington, Va./Austin, Texas) will compete for the women.

Bromberg third in 10-meter prelims as three U.S. divers advance on day one of Pan Am Games

TORONTO – Samantha “Murphy” Bromberg (Bexley, Ohio/Austin, Texas) finished third in the women’s 10-meter preliminaries Friday at the Pan American Games to advance to Saturday’s final, while Delaney Schnell (Tucson, Ariz.) also moved on after placing eighth. Zac Nees (Hatfield, Pa./State College, Pa.) will also dive Saturday after coming from behind to finish 12th in Friday’s men’s 3-meter preliminaries.

Competing in front of a packed house at the Pan Am Aquatics Centre, Bromberg scored 326.35 points in the 10-meter preliminaries, finishing behind Canada’s Roseline Filion (353.80) and Mexico’s Paola Espinosa (347.25).

“I was pretty nervous because of the crowd. I’ve never competed before a crowd this big before. I couldn’t even find my parents,” Bromberg said. “The atmosphere here is amazing. Being in the village with all the other athletes and sports is incredible. Everyone is so talented.”

Bromberg scored no lower than 59.20 points on any of her five dives, with her best marks coming on her back 3 ½ tuck for 70.95 points in round two and 69.30 points on her armstand triple back somersault in round three.

“I felt good in prelims. Coming in, I wasn’t feeling 100 percent with all of my dives, so I was happy with how things went,” Bromberg said.

Schnell, the youngest competitor in the field, finished with 265.20 points to qualify for the finals in eighth place. Her best marks came with an inward 3 ½ tuck that earned 68.80 points in round two and a back 2 ½ somersault with 1 ½ twists that earned 62.40 points in round four.

“I had a rough start, but I know what I need to fix heading into finals. This has been a good learning experience for me,” said the 16-year-old Schnell.

Nees scored 327.65 points in the 3-meter preliminaries, with his best dives coming in the last two rounds. In 17th place with two dives to go, Nees scored 74.10 points on his front 4 ½ tuck in the fifth round to move into 13th place. He closed out his list with 66.30 points on his inward 3 ½ tuck, enough to narrowly sneak into the finals. He finished six-tenths of a point of Brazil’s Ian Matos, who was 13th.

“I definitely had some bumps, and I know I can do better in the finals. One of the hardest things for me is getting the first list out of the way when I’m diving at a new place. I’m ready to let it all go in the finals,” Nees said.

Cory Bowersox (Burke, Va./Austin, Texas) scored 321.35 points to finish 14th. He was in 10th place through four rounds, but a miss on his fifth-round front 4 ½ tuck dropped him out of the top 12.

“It was frustrating and a little rough today. I’ve struggled with staying focused and keeping the energy up, and it wasn’t all there today. I wish I would have had a better day, but I’ll turn my focus to (Monday’s) synchro event,” Bowersox said.

The men’s 3-meter final is set for 6 p.m. Saturday, with the women’s 10-meter final to follow. The winners of each event will earn a quota spot for their countries for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.